Canberra DAG

Discourse Analysis Group (DAG)

The Discourse Analysis Group (DAG) is an academic interest group and has met fortnightly since 1997. At meetings we analyse data, discuss contemporary issues facing the field Conversation Analysis (CA), and provide collegial support to one another. The Group has been a vital part in the development of ANU graduate students working within CA. More recently, the group has expanded to include graduate students working within other discourse analytic frameworks. Current members include researchers and graduate students from the Australian National University, University of Canberra, and from Charles Stuart University.

The DAG has an email list, currently run by Sarah McLaughlin, which notifies members and interested parties of the DAG events. Email Sarah to be added to the DAG list to keep up to date on CA events in Canberra and in Australia.

The group started one Friday lunch time in the linguistics tea room in 1997. The idea of having regular meetings arose following a discussion between two PhD students (Belinda Collins and Johanna Rendle-Short) and their supervisor, Tony Liddicoat. They wanted a forum for discussing conversation analysis ideas, looking at data, and reading articles. Initially it was called the DA group, because the course then taught by Tony Liddicoat was called Discourse Analysis, even though the content of the course was Conversation Analysis (CA). It was only later that someone realised we were the DAGs. This is the term that has stuck over the years.

Some of the early members of the group were Nikki Bramley, Belinda Collins, Tony Liddicoat, Pieta Littleton, Marian May, Maurice Nevile, Johanna Rendle-Short. We would meet at 12.30 pm every second Friday.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Australasian Institute for Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis

%d bloggers like this: